Valley National Bank served the Valley from its founding in 1900 through 1992; its iconic logo played a significant role in the region's development and its branches often had iconic architectural design. The Tempe branch was located at the corner of…

The Wigwam design was created by Frank A. Redford, eventually his style became so popular that it became a nationwide phenomenon. His designs depicted Native American architecture through the perspective of the American architecture in the mid 20th…

Opened in 1952 by Dave and Belle Harman along the Tempe-Mesa Highway, the Red Barn served customers for only about twenty years. Among the many items on Harman's menu was "Kentucky Fried Chicken." The family had licensed the recipe from Harland…

Three canals still intersecting Main Street highway were the lifeblood of the farms and ranches that once spanned tens of thousands of acres in east Mesa. The Consolidated, cutting across Main Street just east of Gilbert Road, was built by Dr. A. J.…

Vulture, or Vulture City, lies in Maricopa County. The Post office opened on October 4, 1880 and closed on April 24, 1897. Henry Wickenburg discovered Vulture mine in 1863, which was the richest mine in the area.

The Temple is decorated on its corners with frieze panels that depict Latter-day Saint beliefs about the gathering of Israel from the four corners of the earth as prophesied by Isaiah in the Old Testament of the Bible. A.B. Wright crafted the…

The Polish-Jewish Korrick family opened up their store in the late 1890s. This was one of the first department stores in the Phoenix area along with the Goldwater and Diamond department stores. Sam Korrick arrived in Phoenix in 1895 on a chance…

Los Olivos Mexican Patio located in the heart of Old Town Scottsdale not only offers excellent and authentic Mexican food, it is also a classic American success story. Since its establishment the restaurant has always been family owned and operated.…

Until 2016, the Chicago Cubs have been America’s lovable losers for over a century. For 35 of those years, the Chicago Cubs spent their springs preparing for a grueling season just west of Center Street in North Mesa. Hohokam Stadium opened in the…

The first visitors’ center for the Mesa Temple consisted of a small table and literature racks set up at the temple’s west entrance in the late 1940s. This set-up was soon found to be inadequate and a permanent structure, the Bureau of…

The original pioneers settled in the area around the current city of Peoria in about 1886. Settlers started planting a variety of plants to see what would grow best. Additionally, early farmers raised horses and cattle, sheep, hogs, and grew grains…

Prior to the construction of the Mesa Arizona Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), church members wishing to marry in a temple were required to make the grueling journey on the “Honeymoon Trail.” The trail was…

In 1926, well known architect Frank Lloyd Wright was called to Phoenix to help with the building of the Arizona Biltmore Hotel. This was the beginning of Wright’s long relationship with Arizona. In the early 1960s, Arizona State University…

Maple Ash began its construction in the early 1900’ s and is considered one of the oldest existing historic neighborhoods in Tempe. Its’ borders extend from the south side of University Drive to the north side of Hayden Lane and from the west…

The intersection of Main and Center street has been at the heart of Mesa's history for over a century. Now home to the Mesa Arts Center, conceived Mesa's firs shopping center was built in 1908 by A.J. Chandler on the corner of Main and MacDonald.…

Farming gave Mesa its early identity. The legacies live on in street names, such as Dobson Road. Cliff Dobson co-owned the Baseline Cattle Company and Sheep Springs Sheep Company that was started in the early 1900s. The companies, known as Dobson…

Arizonans often joke that whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting. Water's value to the state was made evident by the 1934 "war" with California as well as by longstanding disputes with neighboring states over allocation of the Colorado River.…

"Mother and daughter, father and son, may all be found splashing about in the cooling water of the Salt River canal, commonly known as the 'Town Ditch,' almost any evening now. There are regular canal 'beaches' where Phoenicians congregate in great…

Built in 1956, the Hotel Valley Ho never had time for its original grand opening. The rooms filled up far too quickly to bother. And the full bookings continued as tourists came to participate in Scottsdale’s vibrant arts and culture and industrial…

Hitching posts, knotty pine and board-and-batten bedecked storefronts, Western names and stylized architecture are Old Town’s lasting memorials to early Scottsdale’s efforts to craft a unique identity for the town—one that would bring tourists…

Scottsdale, Arizona—and much of the American Southwest—would not be the same without its Mexican-Spanish heritage and culture. From its earliest days, Scottsdale enveloped a mélange of peoples and cultures, with Anglos coexisting alongside Pima…

Prior to becoming a popular watering hole and part of the set-dressing of Scottsdale’s self-conscious efforts to become “the West’s most Western town,” the building now housing the Rusty Spur Saloon was the Farmers State Bank of Scottsdale.…

Built in 1909, Scottsdale’s Little Red Schoolhouse is a testament to the Progressive values, attitudes, and aesthetics that shaped the growing community at the turn-of-the-century, and women and children were at the center of it. Middle-class…

When the Hotel Valley Ho opened it 1956, it quickly became a playground for Hollywood refugees. James Cagney, Rudy Vallee, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Marilyn Monroe all relaxed under its roof. Like many local resorts, the…